On February 22, Attorney General Merrick B. Garland appointed Jonathan Mayer as the Justice Department’s inaugural Chief Science and Technology Advisor and Chief Artificial Intelligence Officer. Mayer will sit in the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Policy and lead the Department’s newly established Emerging Technologies Board which coordinates and governs AI and other emerging technologies across the Department. Mayer will also build a team of technical and policy experts in cybersecurity and AI. The Chief AI Officer position is a role required by President Biden’s Executive Order on AI. Mayer is an assistant professor of computer science and public affairs at Princeton University and served as the technology law and policy advisor to then-Senator Kamala Harris as well as the chief technologist to the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau. Continue Reading Justice Department Hire’s First Chief AI Officer

On February 21, a proposed class action lawsuit was filed against an auto finance company in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia alleging various violations of the Military Lending Act (“MLA”). The named plaintiff is a “Covered Borrower” under the MLA, which includes active-duty military servicemembers and their dependents.Continue Reading Auto Finance Company Faces Class Action Lawsuit for Targeting Military Families

On February 7, a Florida-based cryptocurrency company agreed to settle charges brought by the SEC and the California Department of Financial Protection and Innovation alleging that, an interest-earning feature offered on the company’s platform, constitutes an illegal securities offering.Continue Reading Crypto Platform Settles SEC and State Regulator Charges over Interest Bearing Feature on Customer Accounts

On February 5, the DOJ and North Carolina’s attorney general announced a $13.5 million settlement deal with a large regional bank over redlining allegations.Continue Reading DOJ and North Carolina Attorney General Reach $13.5M Settlement in Discriminatory Lending Case

On February 6, the FTC announced that it had reached proposed settlements with several defendants in a pending action where the parties were accused of operating a fraudulent student debt relief scheme and collecting so-called “junk fees” from consumers.Continue Reading FTC Announces Settlement of Junk Fee Enforcement Action

On January 19, the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) and New York Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) each issued orders settling an action against a large global bank for alleged BSA/AML violations and other compliance failures. The FRB issued a cease and desist order with a $2.4 million civil money penalty, while the NYDFS issued a consent order with a $30 million civil money penalty.Continue Reading Federal Reserve and NYDFS Penalize Large Global Bank for BSA/AML and Other Compliance Failures

On January 18, the FTC issued a consent order prohibiting a digital platform and data aggregator from selling or licensing precise consumer location data on the grounds that it did not obtain consumer consent before collecting and selling the data to advertisers.Continue Reading FTC Cracks Down on Data Aggregator, Bans Sale of Precise Consumer Location Data

On January 10, the CFPB and the attorneys generals of Colorado, Delaware, Illinois, Minnesota, New York, North Carolina, and Wisconsin sued a New York-based debt relief company and its founders in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of New York for violating the Telemarketing Sales Rule as well as New York and Wisconsin state law.Continue Reading CFPB and Attorneys General Sue Debt-Relief Enterprise