On May 23, the CFPB and the New York Attorney General’s office filed a proposed stipulated judgment in federal district court against a debt collection operation, including several companies and individuals, to resolve allegations that the operation engaged in deceptive tactics to induce consumer payments. The complaint, filed in 2020, alleged that the defendants violated the CFPA, FDCPA, and various New York laws to induce consumer payments by (i) falsely claiming arrest and imprisonment for failure to pay, (ii) falsely threatening legal action, (iii) inflating debt amounts owed, (iv) harassing debt collection victims by contacting family members, coworkers, employers, and friends, (v) placing harassing phone calls to debtors, and (vi) failing to provide statutorily required notices.
Continue Reading CFPB, NY Reach $4M Settlement with Debt Collection Operation

On May 10, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen presented the Financial Stability Oversight Council (FSOC) Annual Report before the Senate Banking Committee about the need for sensible stablecoin legislation (we have previously discussed the President’s Working Group (PWG) report on stablecoins here and here).  Secretary Yellen cites the findings in the PWG report as reason to conclude that “the current statutory and regulatory frameworks don’t provide consistent and comprehensive standards for the risks of stablecoins as a new type of payment products, and urges Congress to enact legislation to ensure that stablecoins and such arrangements have a federal prudential framework.”
Continue Reading Stablecoin Regulation Update

On May 16, the CFPB released a report examining metrics on mortgage servicers’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.  According to the report, homeowners are still facing significant risks and challenges in working with mortgage servicers, particularly borrowers struggling with mortgage payments after their COVID-19 hardship forbearances and other protections under the CARES Act have expired.
Continue Reading CFPB Report on Mortgage Servicers Examines Industry Responses After Pandemic Protections End

On May 17, the FDIC and the CFPB took parallel actions to combat the misuse of  the name or logo of the FDIC and deceptive representations about deposit insurance.  The FDIC approved a final rule implementing its statutory authority to prohibit any person or organization from making misrepresentations about FDIC deposit insurance or misusing the FDIC’s name or logo.  The CFPB followed suit by releasing Consumer Financial Protection Circular 2022-02 providing that company’s likely violate the CFPA’s prohibition on deception acts or practices if they misuse the name or logo of the FDIC or engage in false advertising or make misrepresentations to consumers about deposit insurance, regardless of whether such conduct (including the misrepresentation of insured status) is engaged in knowingly.
Continue Reading FDIC and CFPB Take Action to Protect Against Misrepresentations about FDIC Insured Status and Misuse of Name and Logo

On May 9, the CFPB released an advisory opinion affirming that ECOA and its implementing rule, Regulation B, protect not only those persons actively seeking credit, but also those who have sought and received credit.  The CFPB stated in the opinion that “[d]espite this well-established interpretation, the Bureau is aware that some creditors fail to acknowledge that ECOA and Regulation B plainly apply to circumstances that take place after an extension of credit has been granted, including a revocation of credit or an unfavorable change in the terms of a credit arrangement.”  In addition, the Bureau states that it is “aware that some creditors fail to provide applicants with required notifications that include a statement of the specific reasons for the adverse action taken or disclose an applicant’s right to such a statement.”
Continue Reading CFPB Affirms that ECOA Protects Consumers After Receiving Credit

In March, U.S. Department of Treasury issued its annual General Explanations of the Administration’s Revenue Proposals, commonly known as the “Green Book.”  Among other revenue proposals, the Treasury addressed the treatment of on-demand pay arrangements or earned wage access (EWA) programs, which have risen in popularity in recent years (previously discussed in our Labor and Employment Blog).  EWA programs generally allow employees to access accrued wages before the end of their regular pay cycle.
Continue Reading Treasury Department Proposes Non-Loan Status for Earned Wage Access

On April 29, the CFPB filed a proposed order in federal court seeking final judgment against three California-based defendants for engaging in unlawful fee-charging practices and deceptive telemarketing. According to the complaint, the defendants, a student loan debt relief business and a general debt-settlement company, along with their owner and CEO charged illegal upfront fees and deceived customers into paying for debt relief services in violation of the Consumer Financial Protection Act (CFPA) and Telemarking Sales Rule (TSR).  The CFPB alleges that defendants wrongfully charged more than 9,000 consumers with federal student-loan debt a total of approximately $10.5 million in illegal upfront fees, and used deceptive sales tactics to lure consumers into signing up for certain debt-relief services.  If approved by the court, defendants would be banned from performing debt relief and settlement activities.  The CEO would also be require to pay a civil monetary penalty of $30,000.
Continue Reading No Relief in Sight: CFPB and FTC Continue to Take Action Against Debt Settlement Companies

On May 2, the CFPB released its Spring 2022 Supervisory Highlights. The findings of the report, which generally cover examinations completed between July and December 2021, are issued to help institutions and the general public better understand how we examine institutions for compliance with Federal consumer financial laws.  Highlights include the following findings:
Continue Reading CFPB Issues Spring 2022 Supervisory Highlights