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Moorari Shah is a partner in the Finance and Bankruptcy Practice Group in the firm's Los Angeles and San Francisco offices.

On May 21, the Massachusetts Attorney General entered into an Assurance of Discontinuance (“AOD”) with a California-based fintech alleging that it was the “true lender” of its consumer installment loans. Under the terms of the settlement, the fintech is required to pay $625,000 in restitution, request deletion of tradelines on credit reports for loans reported to credit bureaus, and cease doing business in the state. Continue Reading Massachusetts AG Forces Fintech from State as Part of “True Lender” Settlement

The CFPB is continuing its crusade against so called “junk fees,” and now is looking at credit reporting fees. In a May 20 speech to the Mortgage Bankers Association, Director Rohit Chopra highlighted the rising costs of obtaining credit reports which he stated affects both lenders and consumer. Chopra criticized FICO’s recent move to a flat fee pricing model for credit scores, stating that it led to a 400% increase in costs for many lenders. He also complained about FICO’s policy of charging the same fee for both soft and hard credit inquiries, despite the fact that there are significant differences in the amount of information provided.Continue Reading CFPB Director Targets Credit Reporting Fees

On May 16, the United States Supreme Court, in a 7-2 ruling, held that the CFPB’s funding mechanism does not violate the Appropriations Clause of the U.S. Constitution. As we previously discussed in greater detail here, under the Dodd-Frank Act, Congress provided a standing source of funding for the CFPB outside the ordinary annual appropriations process—the Bureau draws from the Federal Reserve System an amount determined by its Director, subject only to an inflation-adjusted cap. Plaintiffs had argued the structure violated the Appropriation’s Clause as it did not go through an annual appropriations process and was effectively “double insulated” from congressional oversight. Continue Reading CFPB Wins at the Supreme Court

On April 9, 2024, seven states filed suit against the Biden administration in an attempt to block its new “SAVE” plan, an income-driven repayment plan that leads to eventual loan forgiveness. The case is pending in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri.Continue Reading States Sue the Biden Administration to Stop Loan Relief Plan

On March 29, the CFPB and the FTC jointly filed an amicus brief with the Eleventh Circuit in a matter involving a dispute under the Fair Credit Reporting Act. The case involves a consumer who filed disputes with a consumer reporting agency (CRA) after discovering multiple errors in her credit file, including incorrect personal information. However, the CRA failed to delete the disputed information, notify any furnishers of the consumer’s dispute, or provide the sources of the disputed information. The consumer sued, alleging the CRA violated the FCRA’s reinvestigation requirement by failing to reinvestigate her dispute regarding her name, address, and SSN information. The CRA claimed the text of the CRA did not require it to reinvestigate incorrect personal identifying information. At summary judgment, the district court found that while the reinvestigation requirement applied to personal identifying information, the CRA did not “willfully or negligently” violate the FCRA because its interpretation of the reinvestigation requirement was not objectively unreasonable.Continue Reading CFPB and FTC Argue Consumer Reporting Companies Have an Obligation to Correct Errors in Joint Amicus Brief

On April 4, the CFPB published a new Issue Spotlight, titled “Banking in Video Games and Virtual Worlds” that analyzes the increased commercial activity within online video games and virtual worlds and the apparent risks to consumers—in this case, to online gamers. In particular, this report examines how “game assets” are being used and the associated risks, including the emergence of products or services that resemble traditional consumer financial products or services. Continue Reading Report Signals CFPB Taking Aim at Video Game and Virtual Worlds Industries

On March 25, a coalition of trade groups filed suit in the United States District Court for the District of Colorado, challenging a Colorado law which would have opted the state Section 521 of the Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act of 1980 (“DIDMCA”), a federal law enacted to create competitive equality between state-chartered banks and national banks. The law, set to take effect on July 1, 2024, would have subject out-of-state lenders to the state’s rate cap. Continue Reading Lenders Sue to Block Colorado’s Interest Rate ‘Opt-Out’ Law

On March 27, the CFPB issued Circular 2024-02, which warns that remittance providers may be liable under the CFPA for certain deceptive marketing practices related to the speed or cost of sending a remittance transfer. Under EFTA’s “Remittance Rule,” (Subpart B of Regulation E), the term “remittance transfer” includes most electronic transfers of funds sent by consumers in the United States to recipients in other countries. Alarmingly, the Bureau notes that providers may be liable irrespective of whether they are in compliance with the Remittance Rule’s disclosure requirements. The Bureau’s circular singles out the following advertising practices by remittance providers as potentially deceptive in violation of the CFPA:Continue Reading CFPB Issues Guidance on Deceptive Practices by Remittance Transfer Providers

On March 21, Wisconsin enacted into law Assembly Bill 574, positioning it as the third state, following Nevada and Missouri, to establish a comprehensive regulatory framework for earned wages access (EWA) services and products. The legislation is set to take effect September 1, 2024.Continue Reading Wisconsin Signs Earned Wage Access Bill into Law

In a significant ruling on March 19, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals held that the CFPB can proceed with its lawsuit against a group of Delaware student loan trusts rejecting their claims that they are just passive financing entities outside the reach of the Bureau’s authority. Continue Reading Third Circuit Ruling Gives CFPB Green Light to Enforce Against Student Loan Trusts